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Our Barichu Double Receives 94 Points!

2019-07-16T09:32:40-04:00

We received a 94 point score for this coffee from Coffee Review in July, 2019!

Blind Assessment:

Richly sweet, deeply savory, elegantly balanced. Dried apricot, maple syrup, narcissus, sandalwood, cacao nib in aroma and cup. Sweet-tart-savory in structure with vibrant, juicy acidity; plush, syrupy mouthfeel. The finish leads with notes of dried apricot and cacao nib in the short, rounding to narcissus and sandalwood in the long.

Notes:

Produced by the Barichu Cooperative from trees of the SL28, SL34, Ruiru 11 and Batian varieties of Arabica. This coffee is available exclusively as a part of the Barrington Coffee Curated Collection, which includes four ounces each of three distinguished coffees for $39.95. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A mesmerizing Kenya that is equally balanced among sweet, tart and savory impulses, with a particularly lively acidity.

Our Barichu Double Receives 94 Points!2019-07-16T09:32:40-04:00

Coffee Climate Talk

2019-06-13T15:42:34-04:00

Coffee Climate Talk – this Sunday April 28th at 12:30pm with Barth Anderson from Barrington Coffee.

Coffee Climate

April 28 @ 12:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Join Mass Audubon’s Berkshire Sanctuaries for free food and informal conversation with Barrington Coffee. Food, refreshments, and a short presentation from Barrington Coffee on their climate engaged coffee selection and production. Bring a friend, meet new friends, and take part in relaxed and friendly conversation on climate change and coffee. At Dottie’s Café, 444 North St, Pittsfield.

Coffee Climate Talk2019-06-13T15:42:34-04:00

Our Ketiara Receives 92 Points!

2019-04-10T10:30:31-04:00

We received a 92 point score for this coffee from Coffee Review in April, 2019.

Blind Assessment:

Sweetly pungent, earthy. Moist, fresh-fallen leaves, orange zest, fresh-cut pine, cocoa, lily in aroma and cup. Richly tart in structure, with a savory edge. Light but buoyant mouthfeel. The finish consolidates around cocoa, orange and a deep, lily-like floral note.

Notes:

This coffee tied for the fourth-highest rating in a cupping of coffees from Sumatra for Coffee Review’s April 2019 tasting report. Coffees like this one from the northern part of the Indonesian island of Sumatra are valued for their complex earth and fruit notes that appear to result largely from unorthodox fruit removal and drying practices called “wet-hulling.” Produced by the Ketiara Cooperative, the only women-led cooperative in Indonesia, with 867 small-holding members. Certified at origin as fair-trade (by Fairtrade International) and organically grown, but not so labeled. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: Attractive choice for lovers of the traditional Sumatra wet-hulled profile: earthy, pungent, yet bright, offering bonus satisfaction for supporters of progressive, women-led cooperatives.

Our Ketiara Receives 92 Points!2019-04-10T10:30:31-04:00

Women in Coffee

2019-04-17T13:13:42-04:00

In March of 2019 we featured three coffees produced by women lead coffee projects from around the world; Sumatra, Peru and Ethiopia. These spectacular coffees have incredible stories to tell about the women responsible for their creation. 

KETIARA

Produced by The Ketiara Women’s Cooperative, Central Aceh Province, Sumatra

Ketiara Co-Op members picking coffee cherries.

Ketiara has been our primary offering from Sumatra for many years. Its classic syrupy body and low acidity are highlighted by spicy, earthy and stone fruit flavors. Flavors like these are only possible through careful plant husbandry and impeccable application of the traditional wet-hulled process. This fastidious care is undertaken each year by the almost two-thousand members of Koperasi Pedgang Kopi (KOPEPI), also known as The Ketiara Women’s Cooperative.

Though Ketiara has its roots in the 1990’s, the cooperative was founded in 2009 with thirty-eight original members. Ketiara is the only women-lead coffee cooperative in Indonesia. The  Chairwoman, Ibu Rahmah, has been with the organization since its inception, carefully guiding its development. In 2011, the Co-op attained Fair Trade Certification and now includes only small, independent farm members. The current geographic area they farm comprises over 836 hectares. A shade canopy and companion planting of staple food crops is found throughout the Co-op, along with a broad diversity of wildlife including the endangered Sumatran tiger, elephant and orangutan.

The coffee varieties cultivated at Ketiara are little known outside of Indonesia and include Tim Tim, Bergendal, Sidkalang and others. Once picked, the coffee cherries are wet-hulled. The wet-hulled process is unique as it involves simultaneously removing the fruit and the hull surrounding the coffee seed. Once stripped, the seeds are then dried in the sun. Because of its heavy body and low acidity, this coffee is quite versatile. Even at our light roast treatment this coffee is a great choice for those who drink their coffee with milk or cream.

The Ketiara is a part of our Origin Certified(TM) Program and has been certified at origin by Control Union Certifications B.V. as having been produced without the use of pesticides, herbicides or synthetic fertilizers as we’ll as having been certified Fair Trade at Origin by Fairtrade International (FLO).

GATO NEGRO

Produced by Las Damas de San Ignacio, Cajamarca, Peru

Luzmila Feliu, Sales and Logistics Coordinator for COOPFASI

The Gato Negro is grown high up in the Andes Mountains along the northern most border of Peru. This shared equity cooperative was formed in 1969 by a priest named Francisco Cuentas and ten coffee growers. The Co-op now includes just under four hundred farmers who work together as the Cooperativa Agraria Frontera San Ignacio (COOPFASI). Women comprise a majority of the membership and they are locally known as Las Damas de San Ignacio.

In 2016, COOPFASI designed a loan distribution program. This program supports members with land improvement, livestock husbandry, home renovation and local craft production. They have also built a computer lab open to all members. Women serve as board members, managers, quality control evaluators as well as producers.Tenets of gender equity and the empowerment of women remain central to their cooperative mission.

This coffee is a go for dark roast lovers. Our roast profile for this coffee celebrates super smooth, dark roast character with tons of chocolate flavor. It is versatile enough for all brewing methods and it is great straight or with milk.

As part of the Barrington Coffee Origin Certified™ Program, our Gato Negro has been certified at origin by the Organic Crop Improvement Association (OCIA) as having been produced without the use of pesticides, herbicides or synthetic fertilizers and by the Rainforest Alliance as having been shade grown.

AMARO GAYO

Produced by Asnakech Thomas, Sidama, Ethiopia

Asnakech Thomas with her flowering coffee trees

Asnaketch Thomas is Ethiopia’s only female coffee grower, miller and exporter. Her farm is located high in the Amaro Mountains, a region characterized by beautiful bamboo forests and abundant waterfalls. At her mill she has the capacity to produce natural processed as well as fully washed coffee. Cherry selection and her attention to every detail from sorting through processing elevates her coffee to grand stature and year after year her coffee displays its characteristic heady profile.

This natural process Amaro Gayo has a plush aroma with fruit flavors of blueberry, blood orange and dried cranberry along with spicy qualities of mace and cacao. It is great in the press-pot and also makes for a hefty single origin espresso.

Asnakech’s pioneering work as an agricultural leader in Ethiopia has involved her commitment to help establish an advocacy program for other women coffee growers. The group she helped to establish group is called the Ethiopian Women In Coffee Association (EWiC). You can learn more about the EWiC and their involvement at the 2017 World of Coffee Budapest Convention here.

In 2018, Asnakech’s coffee farm and coffee mill were destroyed during tribal warring on the border of Sidama. Acres of her coffee trees were lost. Her husband was shot and her Farm Manager was killed. Through sheer conviction, Ansakech has been able to hold onto the farm, rebuild the mill and Amaro Gayo continues to produce. In spite of the trials she has endured we are all hoping for another great harvest in the upcoming year.

This coffee is part of our Origin Certified(TM) Program and has been certified at origin by the USDA as having been produced without the use of pesticides, herbicides or synthetic fertilizers.

Women in Coffee2019-04-17T13:13:42-04:00

93 Points for our Feku Double!

2019-04-10T10:32:18-04:00

Our Feku Double from Oromoa, Ethiopia received a 93 point score in February, 2019 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Bright, crisp, sweetly tart. Apricot, almond, cocoa nib, cedar, honey in aroma and cup. Sweet-tart structure with juicy acidity; velvety mouthfeel. A quietly rich finish centers around apricot and honey, with cocoa nuance.

Notes:

This coffee tied for the third-highest rating in a cupping of coffees from New England roasters for Coffee Review’s February 2019 tasting report. Produced by Feku Jiberil from traditional, largely indigenous varieties of Arabica long grown in southern Ethiopia. Processed by the wet or washed method (fruit skin and pulp are removed before drying). This coffee is available exclusively as a part of the Barrington Coffee Curated Collection, which includes four ounces each of three distinguished coffees for $39.95. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A classic wet-processed Ethiopia cup: bright and vibrant, with leading notes of stone fruit and cocoa.

93 Points for our Feku Double!2019-04-10T10:32:18-04:00

Forbes Holiday Gift Guide 2018 – 12 Best Coffee Roasters in the US

2019-02-12T15:50:58-04:00

Holiday Gift Guide 2018: The 12 Best Coffee Roasters In The U.S.

Give the gift of coffee for the winter holidays.

As beverages go, there’s nothing hotter than specialty coffee at the moment. Third-wave roasters (or are we already seeing the surge of the fourth wave?) have elevated the game for all of us who appreciate a great morning cup. These 12 specialty roasters across the U.S.—from major metropolitan cities to tiny hamlets to college towns—offer the best coffee you can buy in the U.S., hands down. They all source green beans with curiosity and passion (and the three roasters from Hawai’i are also farmers, themselves), traveling the globe to seek variety, experimentation, and sometimes rarity. And they are all committed to practices of economic sustainability by offering farmers fair prices for their coffee, which is produced through tireless work that’s difficult on the body. Then, they roast it with care, developing a roast profile that honors the inherent qualities of each coffee. Lastly, they even teach you the basics of how to brew it at home.

Barrington’s Guatemala Tasting Pair.BARRINGTON COFFEE ROASTERS

Barrington Coffee Roasting Company

Based in Lee, Massachusetts, Barrington offers a range of exceptional coffees for gift-giving throughout the year. Try their Twenty-Five Anniversary Blend as an espresso or a pourover or go for one of their curated tasting pairs.

Forbes Holiday Gift Guide 2018 – 12 Best Coffee Roasters in the US2019-02-12T15:50:58-04:00

“Big-Bean” Coffee Varieties

2019-01-11T11:03:59-04:00
From Coffee Review – November 13th 2018
By Kim Westerman November 13, 2018|ReviewsTasting Report

“Big-Bean” Coffee Varieties: Novelty, Scarcity, and Atypical Sensory Pleasures

Among the hundreds of coffees we review each year at Coffee Review, a very small percentage represent what we’ve come to affectionately call “big-bean” varieties, coffee from tree varieties that produce beans that are dramatically larger than average. The most common of these are Pacamara, Maragogipe and Maracaturra, though there are some even more obscure varieties whose beans are also exceptionally large. Since 2014, we’ve reviewed only 38 coffees from these three varieties. Remarkably, eight of them landed on our very competitive Top 30 Coffees list in the year they were reviewed.

Yellow Pacamara from Mierisch’s Finca La Huella after processing. Courtesy of Kakalove Cafe.

For this month’s tasting report, we decided to take a closer look at these curious varieties. We asked roasters to send in their favorite “big-bean” coffees, and received 75 samples in all. The vast majority were Pacamaras, and it is this variety that fared best in our cupping (some theories about why below). We review the top nine coffees here, eight of which are Pacamaras, along with one impressive Maragogipe.

A Brief History of Big Beans

Maragogipe, also known as “elephant bean,” was discovered growing in a field near the town of Maragogipe in Bahia, Brazil in the late 19th century. It never took off as a single-origin coffee because, though it adapts well to colder climates, it’s porous and difficult to roast and tends to be woody and flat in the cup. While it originated in Brazil, it’s now grown most widely throughout Central America, though in small quantities. Although its main appeal may be the novelty of its gigantic beans, when grown and processed carefully and roasted sensitively, it can deliver a subtly unique sensory profile that leans toward the sweet-savory.

Pacamara, a hybrid of Pacas and Maragogipe, was the culmination of 30 years of research in El Salvador. Pacas, named after the family that discovered this natural mutation of the highly regarded Bourbon variety on their farm in 1956, is a short, hearty tree that is resilient to wind and climate fluctuations, and tends to produce high yields. Pacamara retains the large beans of the Maragogipe but typically produces a deeper, more complex cup. Pacamara was officially rolled out by the Salvadoran Institute for Coffee Research (ISIC) in the 1980s.

Yellow Pacamara trees growing at Mierisch’s Finca La Huella in Nicaragua. Courtesy of Small Eyes Cafe.

Maracaturra, a hybrid of Maragogipe and Caturra, was developed in Nicaragua by Byron Corrales at Finca Los Pinos, an organic-certified and biodynamic coffee farm. Like Pacas, Caturra is a compact-growing, high-yielding variety that grows well throughout Central America. The Maracaturra was originally offered only through Thanksgiving Coffee, a roaster in Fort Bragg, California known for its pioneering work in sustainability, but it is now also grown in Guatemala and El Salvador and available to consumers by way of a number of specialty coffee roasters in the U.S. and Asia.

On the Cupping Table

Whenever we discover that a coffee we’ve blind-cupped is a Pacamara, Maragogipe or Maracaturra, our interest is piqued. The three of us who regularly cup together have had a running discussion for some time about these big beans, attempting to determine whether they share a common character or overlapping sensory descriptors.

One category of sensation that does often turn up is savory, a basic taste associated with brothy depth. But once we identify it, the questions follow. In a particular sample, is “savory” a positive? (The short answer for us is yes, when it’s juxtaposed with sweetness.) Is the savory element associated with a spice note, an earth-toned accent, an aroma or flavor akin to pipe tobacco? An especially aromatic wood? Perhaps even a non-dessert food or a bittersweet flower? How about fine musk? These are all distinct possibilities when cupping these big-bean varieties.

Barrington Coffee’s flavor wheel for its Guatemala Pacamara Los Cuxinales. Courtesy of Barrington Coffee.

The samples we received for this report were far more diverse than suggested by our intermittent experience of these coffees over the last few years. Our expectations were not so much contradicted, as enlarged in often surprising ways. The nine coffees we review here, ranging in score from 92-95, are, at turns, sweetly savory, sweet-tart, bittersweet, and spice-toned. All are vibrant and engaging, with nuances in acidity and mouthfeel.

The Top-Scoring Coffees

While about half of the samples submitted scored a respectable 90-91 or higher, a quarter scored between 84 and 89, and the remaining quarter languished in the 80-83 range, close to falling out of the specialty category entirely. In other words, these big-bean coffees are all over the map from a green-quality and roasting perspective. But the good coffees are very good. And in this cupping, the Pacamara coffees were far and away the most impressive.

Only one non-Pacamara landed in the top nine, the 94-scoring Guatemala La Providencia Maragogype (an alternative spelling to Maragogipe) from Bird Rock Coffee Roasters in San Diego. President and director of coffee Jeff Taylor says that, when this coffee showed up on his table, he was surprised to learn it was a Maragogipe, a variety he’d always pigeonholed as papery and flat. In contrast, this La Providencia is an exciting paradox: high-toned yet deep, with both sweet (wisteria) and bitter-leaning (hops) floral notes.

Even when sourced successfully, these large-beaned varieties present challenges for roasters. Tom Chuang, owner-roaster of Small Eyes Cafe, a nano-roaster in Taiwan, whose Nicaragua Mierisch Yellow Pacamara Honey rated 93, says that the big beans are notoriously difficult to roast because of their unusual size and porousness.

Tom Chuang, of Small Eyes Cafe, at his roastery in Yilan, Taiwan. Courtesy of Small Eyes Cafe.

Ted Stachura, director of coffee at Equator Coffee (El Salvador Finca Himalaya Pacamara, 92) thinks that the reason Pacamara is cupping better than the other varieties, in general, is because “specialty coffee farmers (especially in El Salvador) have been focusing on this variety for many years now and seem to have dialed in the production process in a way that they haven’t with other big-bean types.”

A second high-scoring El Salvador Pacamara, a black-honey processed Finca El Cerro from Red Rooster Coffee Roasters (93), is cleanly fruit-toned with elegant roasted cacao nib underneath. Head roaster Tony Greatorex says the black honey process, involving drying the beans inside the sweet pulp of the coffee fruit, works well for Pacamara, a variety that can sometimes skew “more toward wild and savory than sweet.” “The black honey process,” he says, “emphasizes the sweetness potential and provides pleasing balance and depth.”

Red Rooster’s Pacamara Black Honey from El Salvador. Courtesy of Red Rooster Coffee.

The other Pacamaras we review here are from Guatemala and Nicaragua. The highest-rated coffee in this report is from Fumi Coffee in Taiwan: a natural-processed Guatemala Finca La Hermosa rated 95. Owner-roaster Yu Chih Hao compares this particular Pacamara to Gesha (also spelled Geisha), one of the most expensive coffees in the world. Like Gesha, Pacamara is relatively rare, and he says, “The high altitude at which this coffee was grown gives it a citrusy acidity somewhat like Gesha that adds complexity to the cup.”

Four additional Pacamaras scored 93, two from Guatemala and two from Nicaragua. Augie’s Guatemala Finca Insul is delicate and sweetly spice-toned, while Barrington’s Guatemala Finca Cuxinales impresses with a complex bittersweet balance. Both are washed-process coffees that foreground rich floral tones.

In the roastery at Augie’s in Redlands, California. Courtesy of Augie’s.

Two Nicaraguas, also rated 93, represent the other end of the sensory spectrum, with sweet-tart fruits leading the way, not surprisingly, as one is natural-processed (dried in the fruit), and the other honey-processed (dried in the fruit pulp after the skins were removed). Kakalove Cafe‘s Mierisch Yellow Pacamara Honey (the same green coffee submitted by Small Eyes Cafe, above), combines richly tart tamarind notes with maple syrup and spice tones akin to pink peppercorn and narcissus. And Toronto roaster Hale Coffee Company‘s Finca La Benedicion Natural centers around a cleanly sweet fruit ferment redolent of raspberry liqueur. The ballast here is creamy cashew butter and spicy sandalwood.

If this sampling of coffees is representative, it seems that the Pacamara is potentially quite versatile in its performance across a range processing methods, including washed, natural and variations on honey.

The Big Bean Appeal

What’s the chief appeal of big-bean varieties for consumers? The novelty of the large bean size? The often distinctive cup profile? Perhaps the enigmatic variety names?

Bird Rock’s Maritza Suarez-Taylor, director of quality control, says that the bean size is definitely intriguing for her customers. She adds that, “The relative scarcity of these coffees also provides an opportunity for us to educate people about new varieties.”

Taiwan roasters Huang and Yu Chih Hao agree that the novelty of bean size is an attraction, but rarity is an even more important factor in the Asian market. Their customers are drawn to coffees not easily found elsewhere. Kakalove’s Caesar Tu, a nano-roaster also based in Taiwan, says he has customers who think big beans are inherently better, but in fact he points out that Kakalove’s Yellow Pacamara has a bright acidity that only a certain kind of coffee drinker appreciates. He chose this coffee mainly for its cleanly fruit-forward presentation.

Barth Anderson, co-founder of Barrington Coffee Roasting, agrees. He likes his Cuxinales Guatemala for its tangy acidity, and he adds, “I hazard that the Bourbon roots of the Pacas portion of the Pacamara varietal add to its complexity and vibrancy.”

Barrington Coffee’s Barth Anderson at the cupping table. Courtesy of Barrington Coffee.

Stachura doesn’t think bean size is relevant to his customers, given that Equator’s bags are opaque. Still, he points out that the unfamiliar varietal nomenclature is bound to appeal to the adventurous.

Nevertheless, roasters East and West agree that cup quality and character are most important. We agree, though we acknowledge that the more savory-leaning among the coffees reviewed here may not appeal to all coffee drinkers. Their character may differ a little too dramatically from the more familiar coffee types—sweetly tart, roundly chocolaty, or juicily fruit-toned—we typically reward with high ratings. The sweet-savory structure and suggestions of spice, herb, pipe tobacco, aromatic wood or musk make them one version of what we call “caveat coffees,” coffees to which we assign high ratings, but with the implied caveat that their peculiar style of excellence may not please everyone.

We try to alert consumers to the caveats implied in various coffee styles through detailed reviews of individual coffees. Not all of the big-bean samples we tested were impressive, but the best, including the nine reviewed here, offered exceptional departures from the norm.

Read Reviews

Posted in: Tasting Reports

About the Author: Kim Westerman

Kim Westerman is a licensed Q-grader, a longtime food, wine and travel writer and a certified sommelier. Her work has been published in the New York Times, Forbes, the San Francisco Chronicle, Bay Area Bites, and many other publications. She happily brings her sensory training in wine to the evaluation of coffee in Coffee Review’s Berkeley lab. She also handles communication with roasters and review logistics.

“Big-Bean” Coffee Varieties2019-01-11T11:03:59-04:00

93 Points for our Cuxinales!

2018-11-14T10:13:33-04:00

Our Cuxinales from Antigua, Guatemala received a 93 point score in November 2018 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Balanced, deeply rich and sweet. Butterscotch, sandalwood, dark chocolate, dried apricot, lantana in aroma and cup. Appealing bittersweet structure with brisk acidity; syrupy-smooth mouthfeel. The finish consolidates to notes of dark chocolate and butterscotch.

Notes:

This coffee tied for the third-highest rating in a cupping of coffees from big-bean varieties for Coffee Review’s November 2018 tasting report. Produced at Finca Cuxinales entirely of the Pacamara variety of Arabica. The Pacamara is a big-beaned hybrid of the Bourbon-related Pacas and the huge-beaned Maragogipe, a mutant of the ancient Typica variety. This is a wet-processed or “washed” version, meaning the fruit skin and pulp were removed from the beans immediately after harvesting and before drying. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A deep, chocolaty cup with crisply sweet fruit and floral tones.

93 Points for our Cuxinales!2018-11-14T10:13:33-04:00

An Amazing Espresso Review!

2018-10-29T14:05:00-04:00

We are both pleased and proud to announce that our 25th Anniversary uber-blend just received the highest score in two years for an espresso coffee on Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Evaluated as espresso. Luminous, complexly layered, impossibly rich. Caramelized pineapple, tamarind, star jasmine, chocolate fudge, myrrh in aroma and small cup. Creamy, vivacious mouthfeel; long, flavor-saturated finish. Close to otherworldly in three parts milk: All the notes from the cup harmonize, and new notes surface: suggestions of lychee, pink grapefruit zest, marjoram.

Notes:

This blend was designed to celebrate Barrington Coffee’s 25th anniversary as an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: Barrington’s anniversary blend is worthy of a celebration, brilliantly curated and roasted, and under $15 a bag.

An Amazing Espresso Review!2018-10-29T14:05:00-04:00

La Union Receives 91 Points!

2018-11-05T09:34:16-04:00

Our delicious La Union from Nariño, Colombia received a 91 point score in October 2018 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Crisply sweet, chocolaty. Baker’s chocolate, plum, magnolia, cedar, molasses in aroma and cup. Sweet-toned structure with gentle, round acidity; satiny-smooth mouthfeel. The gently drying finish is redolent with notes of baker’s chocolate and magnolia, with a hint of cedar-like aromatic wood.

Notes:

Produced by La Union de Nariño from trees of the Caturra, Colombia and Castillo varieties of Arabica. This is a wet-processed or “washed” coffee, meaning the fruit skin and pulp were removed from the beans immediately after harvesting and before drying. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A solid Colombia cup: richly chocolate-toned, balanced and sweet.

La Union Receives 91 Points!2018-11-05T09:34:16-04:00

Berlina Geisha Receives 96 Points!

2018-10-29T14:07:40-04:00

We received a 96 point score for this coffee in September of 2018 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Elegant, intensely sweet-tart, resonantly floral-toned. Passionflower, lemon drop, roasted cacao nib, apricot, tamarind in aroma and cup. Sweet-tart structure with bright, juicy acidity; silky, viscous mouthfeel. The finish is resonant with all the flavor notes promised by the cup, leading with apricot and tamarind in the short, cocoa nib in the long, and sweet florals throughout.

Notes:

This coffee is available exclusively as a part of the Barrington Coffee Curated Collection, which includes four ounces each of three distinguished coffees for $39.95. Produced at La Berlina Estate from trees of the botanical variety Geisha (also Gesha). With its bold, boat-shaped beans and distinctive floral and crisply cacao-toned cup, the Gesha continues to be one of the world’s most sought-after coffees, and the Esmeralda versions remain among the most authentic. This is a wet-processed or “washed” version, meaning the fruit skin and pulp were removed from the beans immediately after harvesting and before drying. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A soaring Gesha cup: balanced, both delicate and rich, deeply floral and stone fruit-laden.

Berlina Geisha Receives 96 Points!2018-10-29T14:07:40-04:00

Gatugi Triple Receives 95 Points!

2018-09-21T13:28:48-04:00

We received a 95 point score for this coffee in September of 2018 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Bright, crisply sweet-savory. Black currant, honeysuckle, ripe tomato, spearmint, cedar in aroma and cup. Equal parts sweet, savory and tart in structure with lively acidity; plush, syrupy mouthfeel. Notes of black currant and honeysuckle carry the resonant, flavor-saturated finish.

Notes:

This coffee is available exclusively as a part of the Barrington Coffee Curated Collection, which includes four ounces each of three distinguished coffees for $39.95. Despite grower discontent and urban encroachment on prime coffee lands, Kenya continues to produce some of the world’s most elegant and distinctive coffees. Produced by members of the Othaya Cooperative from trees of the SL28, SL34, Ruiru 11 and Batian varieties of Arabica. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A confident Kenya with a classic cup profile: bright, juicy, with prominent fruit and floral tones grounded by a resonant current of umami.

Gatugi Triple Receives 95 Points!2018-09-21T13:28:48-04:00

Toarco Jaya Receives 92 Points!

2018-09-21T13:23:15-04:00

We received a 92 point score for this coffee in September of 2018 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Sweet-toned, richly savory. Baker’s chocolate, hazelnut butter, narcissus, date, fresh-cut fir in aroma and cup. Sweet-savory structure with rounded, gentle acidity; satiny-smooth mouthfeel. The finish consolidates to baker’s chocolate and aromatic wood notes, with a hint of narcissus-like flowers.

Notes:

This coffee is available exclusively as a part of the Barrington Coffee Curated Collection, which includes four ounces each of three distinguished coffees for $39.95. Toarco (TOraja ARabica COffee) is a coffee project in the famous Sulawesi coffee growing region of Toraja developed and financed by Japan’s Key Coffee Company and its Indonesian partners. Toarco coffees are processed by variants of the orthodox wet or washed method, giving them a brighter and cleaner profile than Sulawesi coffees processed by the locally traditional wet-hulling method. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A chocolaty coffee animated by rich nut and floral tones.

Toarco Jaya Receives 92 Points!2018-09-21T13:23:15-04:00

Tune in LIVE to Slow Food Nations!

2019-01-11T11:03:59-04:00

 A festival of flavor, culture and exploration!

FREE ON LARIMER SQUARE  |  DENVER  |  JULY 13-15, 2018

BUT, if you can’t be here in person, please tune into our live video stream of the summit panels! This is the first time we’re livestreaming the festival, and we hope you take some time this weekend to Slow Down with us.

Slow Food Nations LIVE Schedule

We have a dynamic lineup with Massimo Bottura, Raj Patel, Deb Eschmeyer, and many others. It’s going to be a weekend of rich learning and engaging conversations.

The Future of the Food Movement
Friday, July 13, 12:30pm – 2:00pm

Farming for the Future
Saturday, July 14, 11:45am – 1:30pm

When Disaster Strikes
Saturday, July 14, 3:30pm – 5:00pm

The Buzz About Biodiversity
Sunday, July 15, 11:45am – 1:30pm

Waste Not, Want Not
Sunday, July 15, 3:30pm – 5:00pm

Tune In Here!
Tune in LIVE to Slow Food Nations!2019-01-11T11:03:59-04:00

Mahonda Receives 93 Points!

2018-06-15T13:01:14-04:00

We received a 93 point score for this coffee in June of 2018 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Delicate, complex, chocolate-toned. Dried mulberry, dark chocolate, fine musk, pipe tobacco, pink peppercorn in aroma and cup. Sweetly savory structure with juicy acidity; plump, smooth mouthfeel. The finish, which consolidates to notes of dark chocolate and dried mulberry, is confident and flavor-saturated.

Notes:

This coffee tied for the third-highest rating in a cupping of coffees from the Great Lakes region of Africa for Coffee Review’s June 2018 tasting report. Produced entirely of the Bourbon variety of Arabica and processed at the Buraza Community/Mahonda Washing Station. Burundi is a small, landlocked country in the Great Lakes region of Central Africa. Benefiting from ideal growing conditions and large plantings of local strains of the heirloom Bourbon variety of Arabica, it has recently emerged as a premier Africa fine coffee origin. This is a wet-processed or “washed” version, meaning the fruit skin and pulp were removed from the beans immediately after harvesting and before drying. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: A chocolaty Burundi coffee with richly crisp notes of dried mulberry and an especially appealing acidity, bright and juicy.

Mahonda Receives 93 Points!2018-06-15T13:01:14-04:00

Dodora Double Receives 96 Points!

2018-10-29T14:03:02-04:00

We received a 96 point score for this coffee in March of 2018 from Coffee Review!

Blind Assessment:

Lush, vibrant; intricate and balanced. Fine musk, dried jasmine, passionfruit, bergamot, dark chocolate in aroma and cup. Complex, richly sweet structure with bright acidity. Buoyant, silky mouthfeel. The resonant finish fulfills the promise of the cup, carrying all of the flavor notes, including a hint of white sage, well into the long.

Notes:

This coffee is available exclusively as a part of the Barrington Coffee Curated Collection, four ounces each of three distinguished coffees for $29.95. This selection is produced by Desta Gola, a member of the of the Adame Gorbota Cooperative in the celebrated Yirgacheffe growing region. Southern Ethiopia coffees like this one are produced from distinctive traditional Ethiopian varieties of Arabica long grown in the region. This is a wet-processed or “washed” version, meaning the fruit skin and pulp were removed from the beans immediately after harvesting and before drying. Barrington Coffee is an artisan roaster dedicated to elite coffees, fresh delivery and roasting that foregrounds the coffee and not the roast. Visit www.barringtoncoffee.com or call 800-528-0998 for more information.

The Bottom Line: An exceptional, vivacious Ethiopia coffee in which high-toned floral notes, sweetly tart fruits, and rich chocolate tones harmonize.

Dodora Double Receives 96 Points!2018-10-29T14:03:02-04:00